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  • What is pet insurance?

    Pet insurance helps provide peace of mind that you’ll be able to protect your pet should they suffer… read more

    Pet insurance helps provide peace of mind that you’ll be able to protect your pet should they suffer an unexpected illness or injury. While you may be able to budget for the ongoing day-to-day expenses of keeping your pet healthy, an unforeseen sickness or injury can quickly mount up to thousands of dollars in vet bills, and that’s where pet insurance can help.

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  • Is pet insurance worth it?

    Insurance is the one thing we pay for that we hope we never need to use. But when… read more

    Insurance is the one thing we pay for that we hope we never need to use. But when needed, pet owners are relieved to have it, because you can never predict when something might happen to your pet.

    Pet insurance helps provide peace of mind for pet owners when it comes to their pet’s health care costs. A pet owner can potentially claim up to $20,000 per year through their pet insurance, depending on the type of policy they have taken out.

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  • What does pet insurance cover?

    While there are small variations between pet insurance policies, there are three main types of cover: Accidental Injury… read more

    While there are small variations between pet insurance policies, there are three main types of cover:

    Accidental Injury Only policies cover stated events such as broken bones or motor vehicle incidents.

    Combined Accidental Injury and Illness policies, also cover sickness, which can range from short term infections to major surgery.

    There are also various Stated Events policies such as illness cover for indoor cats and ‘major events’ policies that cover stated accidental injuries and illnesses.

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  • How much does pet insurance cost?

    Your premium is calculated using a few details such as the breed and age of your pet, and… read more

    Your premium is calculated using a few details such as the breed and age of your pet, and the type of cover you have chosen.

    For example, a nine-year-old Great Dane and a one-year-old Jack Russell Terrier have very different vet expenses, so you would expect to pay a different premium for these two pets.

    You should also be aware that your premium will be recalculated when your policy renews. See “Will my premium increase every year?” for more information.

    If you have a current policy and would like further detailed information regarding how your premium is calculated, please refer to your Product Disclosure Statement (PDS).

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  • How much will I get back from a pet insurance claim?

    How much you get back depends on the policy you choose. Some policies pay back up to 100%… read more

    How much you get back depends on the policy you choose. Some policies pay back up to 100% of the claim, where others pay an agreed percentage of the claim and you cover the rest.

    Most policies are based on what’s called a ‘benefit percentage’ reimbursement. For example, an 80% benefit percentage means that if your eligible vet bill comes to $1,000, your pet insurance policy will reimburse $800 and you pay the other $200 (subject to any exclusions, excess or applicable limit). But it’s up to you. You can look for a policy with a different benefit percentage, from as high as 100% where the insurance pays the total amount of the eligible vet bill, to as low as 50% where you cover the other 50%.

    Generally speaking, the price of the policy goes up the higher your benefit percentage.

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  • What is an excess?

    To help reduce your pet insurance premium costs, you may choose to add an excess to your policy…. read more

    To help reduce your pet insurance premium costs, you may choose to add an excess to your policy. An ‘excess’ is a sum that you pay once per condition, per policy period (typically ranging from $50-$200).

    The excess is deducted from your claim payment, which is calculated using your benefit percentage. For example, on an eligible vet bill of $1,000 with an 80% benefit percentage (amounting to $800) and an excess of $100, your pet insurance pays $700 and you pay $300.

    If your pet has an ear condition that requires three visits to the vet in the same policy period, you’ll only be charged one excess fee for the ear condition as it’s to treat the same condition. However, your benefit percentage would still apply on each of those visits.

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  • What is a pre-existing condition?

    A pre-existing condition refers to any health condition (diagnosed or otherwise) that your pet has shown signs of… read more

    A pre-existing condition refers to any health condition (diagnosed or otherwise) that your pet has shown signs of before the purchase of a pet insurance policy (or its applicable waiting period), meaning the condition will not be covered under the policy.

    As some conditions can be cured with treatment and don’t require ongoing care however, pre-existing conditions are assessed differently depending on whether they are considered a temporary or a chronic condition.

    A temporary pre-existing condition is a pet health condition that usually resolves with treatment, and is removed from your policy automatically as an exclusion if your pet hasn’t shown signs of that condition for 18 months or more.

    A chronic pre-existing condition is a pet health condition that requires ongoing care or is more prolonged in nature, so if your pet displays one of these conditions prior to purchasing a pet insurance policy or its applicable waiting period, it will never be covered under the policy.

    Some of these conditions include:

    • Cruciate ligament conditions
    • Intervertebral disc disease
    • Hip dysplasia
    • Elbow dysplasia
    • Patella luxation
    • Endocrine diseases
    • Any other chronic condition.

    An important reminder that these exclusions only relate to pre-existing conditions. If your pet requires treatment after the purchase of a pet insurance policy and its waiting period, all conditions outlined in the policy’s Product Disclosure Statement will be eligible for cover for the life of the policy.

    Please refer to the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) of the pet insurance policy for more details or visit our article on pre-existing conditions here.

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  • Does pet insurance cover pre-existing conditions?

    Similar to other forms of insurance, anything that existed or that you were aware of before your pet… read more

    Similar to other forms of insurance, anything that existed or that you were aware of before your pet was insured is generally excluded from cover. Insurance policies are there to protect against the unexpected so for this reason, claims relating to pre-existing conditions are not covered. This helps keep coverage fair for all customers.

    As some conditions can be cured with treatment and don’t require ongoing care however, pre-existing conditions are assessed differently depending on whether they are considered a temporary or a chronic condition.

    Please refer to ‘What is a pre-existing condition’ above for more information or refer to your pet insurance policy’s Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) for more details.

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  • What is a temporary pre-existing condition?

    A temporary pre-existing condition is a pet health condition that usually resolves itself with treatment, and is automatically… read more

    A temporary pre-existing condition is a pet health condition that usually resolves itself with treatment, and is automatically removed as an exclusion from your policy if your pet hasn’t shown signs or symptoms of that condition for 18 months or more.

    Please refer to the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) of the pet insurance policy for more details or visit our article on pre-existing conditions here.

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  • What is a chronic pre-existing condition?

    A chronic condition is a pet health condition that requires ongoing care or is more prolonged in nature,… read more

    A chronic condition is a pet health condition that requires ongoing care or is more prolonged in nature, so if your pet displays one of these conditions prior to the purchase of a pet insurance policy or its applicable waiting period, it will never be covered under the policy.

    Some of these conditions include:

    • Cruciate ligament conditions
    • Intervertebral disc disease
    • Hip dysplasia
    • Elbow dysplasia
    • Patella luxation
    • Endocrine diseases
    • Any other chronic condition.

    An important reminder that these exclusions only relate to pre-existing conditions. If your pet requires treatment after the purchase of a pet insurance policy and its waiting period, all conditions outlined in the policy’s Product Disclosure Statement will be eligible for cover for the life of the policy.

    Please refer to the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) of the pet insurance policy for more details or visit our article on pre-existing conditions here.

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  • Can a pre-existing condition exclusion be reviewed on my policy?

    All temporary conditions are automatically removed from your pet insurance policy as a pre-existing condition exclusion if your… read more

    All temporary conditions are automatically removed from your pet insurance policy as a pre-existing condition exclusion if your pet hasn’t shown signs or symptoms of that condition for 18 months or more, so there’s nothing more for you to do.

    As chronic pre-existing conditions require ongoing care and were known prior to the purchase of a pet insurance policy, they will never be eligible for cover. This helps keep pet insurance fair for all pet parents, helping more pets get the Veterinary care they need when they experience an unexpected health hiccup.

    Some of these conditions include:

    • Cruciate ligament conditions
    • Intervertebral disc disease
    • Hip dysplasia
    • Elbow dysplasia
    • Patella luxation
    • Endocrine diseases
    • Any other chronic condition.

    An important reminder that these exclusions only relate to pre-existing conditions. If your pet requires treatment after the purchase of a pet insurance policy and its waiting period, all conditions outlined in the policy’s Product Disclosure Statement will be eligible for cover for the life of the policy.

    If you would still like to have a pre-existing condition on your policy reviewed, you can do so anytime. Simply complete the pre-existing condition policy review form with your Vet and we’ll take care of the rest.

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  • What is a bilateral condition?

    A bilateral condition is one that affects body parts of which the pet has at least two, one… read more

    A bilateral condition is one that affects body parts of which the pet has at least two, one on each side of the body, such as eyes, ears and cruciate ligaments. Bilateral conditions will generally be covered if you have the appropriate level of cover, and the condition is not a pre-existing condition, subject to any applicable limits.

    However, when applying a benefit limit (or any other limit) or exclusion, a bilateral condition will be considered a single condition. For example, if your pet displays signs or symptoms of a cruciate ligament condition in the left leg prior to taking out your policy or during the waiting period (a pre-existing condition), vet expenses for a subsequent cruciate ligament condition in the right leg will not be covered.

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  • Will my premium increase every year?

    Yes, your premium will increase each year. This is for two main reasons: Aging pets Just like humans,… read more

    Yes, your premium will increase each year. This is for two main reasons:

    Aging pets

    Just like humans, the older our pets get, the more likely they are to have health hiccups. Cats and dogs age faster than we do, which means that their likely veterinary treatment costs go up rapidly each year too. As a result, the cost of insuring your pet will also increase as they get older.

    Advancements in veterinary treatments
    The overall cost of medical treatment for pets has increased in recent years due to the increased availability of medical treatments, improved technology and ongoing demand for these services. While this is great news for the care of our pets, these treatments come at a significant cost. Year on year treatment costs increase, and this is factored into the cost of pet insurance.

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  • Are insurance premiums the same across all breeds?

    To keep pet insurance fair for all customers, high risk breeds pay a higher premium than low risk… read more

    To keep pet insurance fair for all customers, high risk breeds pay a higher premium than low risk breeds. Some breeds are prone to various health problems whereas others remain relatively healthy over their lifespan. We assess this based on years of claims and veterinary data.

    Your premium will be affected by data relating to the health of pets that are a similar age and breed.

    Premiums also increase as pets age. This is because, as pets age, the risk of suffering from age related conditions are much higher.

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  • When will my claim be paid?

    In most cases if all required documents have been received, claims are settled within five business days, with… read more

    In most cases if all required documents have been received, claims are settled within five business days, with funds transferred electronically the next business day.

    If your insurance provider has a Customer Service Portal, you can also track your claim’s progress online.

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  • Does pet insurance cover dental conditions?

    Some of our policies include cover for dental conditions, and others may offer an optional benefit (that you… read more

    Some of our policies include cover for dental conditions, and others may offer an optional benefit (that you pay additional premium for). Optional cover may be in the form of a dental illness add on, or a small benefit under the Routine Care option. This means pet owners can choose to only pay for the cover they want.

    Note that some policies exclude cover for dental conditions, and you should check the Product Disclosure Statement or insurers website for more information on available options.

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