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Vet services guide

With advancements in veterinary care and access to high-tech diagnostic tools and specialists’ services, our pets are in great hands when it comes to Australian vets. Here we explore some of the more common treatment conditions, costs, and which pet insurance policies could help if the unexpected were to happen.

It’s important to know that these costs are indicative only, based on PetSure’s pet insurance claims data. Your own pet’s treatment costs may vary from these figures depending on the severity and individual circumstances.

Bone Fracture

Any break in the bone due to external force.

Why the difference?

Not all bone fractures are created equal. Some toe fractures for example, may not require surgical intervention, so treatment is less intensive than major fractures of long bones, the hips, skull or spine – which often require surgical treatment and hospitalisation.

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Accidents
• Basic care
• Some Major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

Brachycephalic Airway Disease

A respiratory condition affecting brachycephalic (or flatter faced) pet breads.

Why the difference?

Brachycephalic breeds are at high risk of respiratory obstruction which may be an emergency condition, requiring intensive care and extensive airway surgery to help remove the tissues occluding the airways. Like many diseases, the severity of the problem will determine the extent and cost of the treatment.

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Basic care
• Some major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

A 30-day waiting period typically applies for this condition. Note elective treatments and procedures are excluded under pet insurance, as are pre-existing conditions.

Burns

Injuries or trauma to skin from heat sources, such as fire, hot liquids or electrical.

Why the difference?

Like in humans, a burn may be quite small and minor, requiring minimal treatment by the veterinarian, ranging through to severe or large burns requiring intensive treatment. This may include surgery supportive treatment like IV fluid therapy, IV antibiotics and pain relief and hospitalisation in an intensive care unit.

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Accidents
• Basic care
• Some Major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

Cruciate ligament

Injury to the cruciate ligament (a ligament that helps to stabilise the knee joint).

Why the difference?

Cruciate ligament issues may be treated surgically or medically depending on your vet’s recommendation and your pet’s needs. Differing surgical techniques range in costs, but are recommended based on the individual needs of your pet. Your vet will be able to recommend the best treatment for your best friend’s cruciate ligament injury.

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Accidents
• Some Major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

Most pet insurance policies will have a 6-month waiting period for cruciate ligament conditions, but customers can apply to have this waived. You should check your Product Disclosure Statement and Certificate of Insurance to understand whether your policy covers cruciate ligament conditions.

Diabetes

A disease which prevents the body from being able to properly regulate blood sugar levels.

Why the difference?

Treatment and related costs for diabetes will depend on whether the condition is detected early when the pet is stable, or whether it’s been left untreated, which can sometimes lead to life threatening diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a critical situation requiring intensive lifesaving treatment. As a metabolic disease, diabetes has far reaching complications throughout the body, and complications can include cataracts, urinary tract infections, seizures and kidney failure

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Basic care
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care
• Some stated Indoor Cats policies

A 30-day waiting period typically applies for this condition.
your policy covers cruciate ligament conditions.

Fight or bite wound

Any wound directly resulting from a dog or cat bite/fight.

Why the difference?

Fight and bite wounds can range in severity, treatment requirements and risk of complications. Large dog bites can often result in extensive injuries, requiring intensive medical and surgical treatment. Minor bite wounds often require antibiotic treatment as even tiny bite wounds, have a high likelihood of becoming infected. Early treatment of bite wounds helps reduce the risk of complications.

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Accidents
• Basic care
• Some Major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

A traumatic ligament or tendon injury

Traumatic injury to any ligament and tendon leading to tears, assessed as an accident condition based on diagnosis.

Why the difference?

Ligament and tendon injuries may be treated surgically or managed medically depending on your Vet’s recommendations and your pet’s needs.

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Accidents
• Some Major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

Snake Bite

Poisoning from a snake bite.

Why the difference?

Treatment and related costs for this condition will vary depending on whether the bite is from a non-venomous snake (which may only require first aid and minor treatment); if it’s a suspected snake bite in a clinically well pet (which may require an examination but no treatment); or a venomous snake bite (requiring treatment which may include antivenin, hospitalisation and supportive care).

Pet insurance policies that typically offer some protection against this condition:
• Accidents
• Basic care
• Some Major Events policies (policies that cover a select number of accidents and illnesses)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness)
• Comprehensive (Accident and Illness) plus Routine Care

Any advice provided is general only and may not be right for you. Please consider the Product Disclosure Statement for the relevant product/s you are considering. Median claim amount figures based on PetSure’s 2018 pet insurance claims data, and highest claim amount figures are based on PetSure’s 2016-2018 claims data, for total claimed amount per condition per policy per policy period. Policy exclusions may also apply, such as whether the condition is pre-existing or occurs during the waiting period (for illness conditions). The amount of claim benefits will also vary by policy, including up to any limits which may apply.